Do You Have A Problem With Alcohol? Use Our CAGE Screening Tool To Find Out


The C.A.G.E. test is one of the best known screening tools to determine whether you have a problem with alcohol. Ask yourself 4 questions:

  1. Have you ever felt that you should Cut down on your drinking?
  2. Have you ever felt annoyed by someone else criticising your drinking?
  3. Have you ever felt bad or guilty about your drinking?
  4. Have you ever had a drink first thing in the morning (eye-opener) To steady your nerves, allow you to function “normally” and get rid of your hangover?

What Should I Do If I May Possibly Have An Addiction?

Following on from these 4 questions, if you feel with the results of the screening tool in mind, we highly recommend that you contact your nearest drug and alcohol service or GP for professional help to either cut down or stop drinking all together.

Contact information for your nearest drug and alcohol service or GP (if you are not already) on our help and support page here.


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Published by Drink ’n’ Drugs

Providing useful, relevant, up to date information and support for those suffering from active addiction or those who are in recovery.

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