How Creativity And Art Help With Addiction And Recovery


A common misconception amongst many creative addicts is the idea that substances such as alcohol, heroin, cocaine or hallucinogens can stimulate creativity. They cite that many creative geniuses have also been alcoholics or drug addicts. However in a recent study, Roger Beaty, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Cognitive Neuroscience at Harvard University, found that creativity comes from using different parts of your brain than less creative people use. Drinking and drugging will eventually limit your ability to use any part of your brain efficiently as long term drug or alcohol use permanently alters the way your brain works. So, the idea that drugs or alcohol can improve your creativity is completely erroneous – the opposite is in fact true as substances will limit your creativity.

So, although addiction will ultimately stifle creativity, creativity can eventually play a part in helping an addict recover from the disease of addiction. Often, addicts are using a substance to help them numb or dull negative feelings and emotions that they experience or to deal with past traumas. Once they get into recovery it is not uncommon for an individual to find that they no longer know how to normally express feelings of any kind – negative or positive. Using creative approaches to expression can help people in recovery find a way to communicate what they are feeling without necessarily having to put it into words and use creativity was a way to process and release negative feelings or experiences without resorting to the use of drugs or alcohol.


Being creative can help healing from addiction in various ways. Here are a few examples, however the list is endless:

Healing shame: Once you have stopped drinking and using drugs, you can often feel engulfed by shame, guilt or regret for behaviors and actions that took place whilst you were in active addiction. These negative feelings can sometimes be too difficult to put into words. Expressing these emotions through creative means can often help you process it without it becoming too overwhelming.

Trauma therapy: For some people who have experienced something very traumatic or difficult, they may still find it too difficult to talk about – especially in early recovery and whilst in treatment for their addiction. However, by taking part in something creative, be that art, drama, creative writing or any other type of creative therapy, they may be able to express themselves in other ways or recognise parts of their own traumatic experience in someone else’s words or creative expression. Guided through these experiences by a professional therapist, people who have experienced trauma can often begin to heal wounds they were previously trying to escape from by using drugs, alcohol or any other type of addictive behaviour.

Grieving loss: When giving up drugs, alcohol or any other type of addiction, especially after a sustained period of time, to suddenly let go often feels like you are losing something. There is a grieving process that you must go through to ultimately get to the point of acceptance and reach closure. Closure is extremely important after a long relationship. It allows you to find peace within yourself and resolve issues that may hinder your personal growth down the road. It also gives you trust that everything in your life will eventually fall into place. Addiction is essentially a long relationship – albeit a toxic one – so it’s just as important to find closure and bring that chapter effectively to a close. One way to find closure and process the varying emotions you may feel during the grieving process of letting go, is by writing a ‘goodbye letter’ to substances you are leaving behind. In the letter, you can fully disclose all your thoughts and feelings – it’s a therapeutic way of releasing your innermost tensions. You could then release all of those feelings and emotions by disposing of it however you best see fit. You could burn it, tear it up, shred it, post it to your Keyworker who can then dispose of it. This letting go is both physically and emotionally relieving.

Stimulates joy, freedom and playfulness: Recovery, as wonderful as it is, can be hard. Often when people have been so entrenched in addiction and the fear that preceded it, they have forgotten what fun is. Being creative allows people to reconnect to their childlike playful side.

It’s empowering: Creative activities like dance or painting allows people to feel strong and in control of their environment – an empowering moment for those in recovery who, in active addiction, lost control over themselves and their lives.

There is no “right” way to recover from addiction, which is why a good treatment program, sponsor, fellowship group (if that works for you) and others who are also in recovery will offer various therapeutic methods to help the individual achieve a long lasting recovery. For those who struggle to communicate how they are feeling in group or one to one therapy, creative approaches like the ones we have mentioned so far and will mention later on in this article will allow them to rediscover their voice and slowly begin to find the words they may have lost due to past trauma, negative emotions, thoughts and active addiction.


What Types Of Creative Outlets Could I Explore?

The list of creative outlets you could try and use are only limited by your imagination! However below are some of the more common creative activities people use:

A
Acrobatics
Acting
Animation
Archaeology
Architecture
Art

B
Baking
Ballet
Barbershop singing
Basket making
Batik
Bead work
Beat boxing
Bhangra
Body painting
Braiding
Brass bands
Busking

C
Cake decorating
Calligraphy
Carnival
Cello
Cheerleading
Choral music
Circus arts
Collage
Comedy
Conducting
Conservation
Craft
Creative writing
Crochet
Cross-stitch

D
Dance
Decopauge
Design
Digital/computer painting
DJ-ing
Drama
Drawing

E
Embroidery
Enamelling
Etching

F
Fashion design
Feltmaking
Filmmaking
Floristry
Folk dance
Folk music

G
Games-design
Garden design
Graffiti
Greening
Guided walks

H
Harmonising
Hip-hop
Horticulture

I
Illustration
Imagining

J
Jazz
Jewellery making

K
Kite-flying
Knitting

L
Lacemaking
Landscape design
Leather-tooling
Light painting
Literature

M
Making cards
Marching bands
Mela
Mime
Model building
Morris dancing
Mosaic
Murals
Music

N
Needlework

O
Opera
Origami

P
Painting
Papier-mâché
Photography
Playwriting
Podcasting
Poetry
Pottery
Printmaking
Pumpkin carving
Puppetry

Q
Quiltmaking

R
Reading

S
Salsa
Scrapbooking
Screen writing
Sculpture
Sewing
Singing
Soap making
Songwriting
Spinning
Square dancing
Stained glass
Steelband
Storytelling
Sugarcraft

T
Tap dancing
Tapestry
Theatre
Theatre design

U
Ukulele
Ultra-violet painting
Upcycling
Urban design

V
Videogame design
Videography
Vintage
Violin recitals
Vocal harmonising

W
Watercolour painting
Weaving
Woodcarving
Writing

X
Xylopyrography

Y
Yarning
Yoga

Z
Zithering


Tip: If you can’t come up with something that would interest you, try looking for different topics on the internet that are associated with any previous interests that you had before or while you became an addict.

Published by Drink ’n’ Drugs

Providing useful, relevant, up to date information and support for those suffering from active addiction or those who are in recovery.

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