May Is Mental Health Awareness Month 2021 – Time To Get Involved And Save Lives!

Mental Health Awareness Month is a national month-long observance that was first established in the United States in 1949. It focuses on raising awareness about and educating the general public about mental health, mental health conditions, seeking help for those who’re struggling with their mental health and removing the stigma that still exists in some areas of society.

The month is used to not only bring attention to the many different mental health conditions that people can struggle with, but also to enforce the importance of getting help if you need it as well as shed light on mental health treatment options.

With the involvement of COVID-19 affecting everyone’s mental health, your involvement in this year’s mental health month is more important than ever. Find out more and how you can get involved to benefit you and those around you in 2021. Your involvement can even save lives!…

Are You Making Amends With Those You’ve Hurt In Your Active Addiction? Find Out How Here!

One big part of recovering from a addiction to alcohol or drugs is to attempt to make amends for the past mistakes, guilt, embarrassment, shame or harm that you caused as a result of your active addiction to substances.

However, we often don’t even realise that our behaviour is harmful or negative toward ourselves or others until we enter recovery. As our mind becomes clearer once again, we begin to see the scale of damage that we’ve caused to ourselves, as well as all of the relationships we damaged with family, friends, colleagues, employers and others.
This article will help guide you through the process of making amends with others, working fellowships steps 8 & 9 and overcoming the damage that’s been done as a direct result of your substance use.

4 Tips For Asking For Help When Needed

Asking for help usually means you must admit to something you’d prefer not to mention, asking for help means you must admit you need other people and asking for help means you can’t do something by yourself.

It is often said that admitting to yourself that you have a problem with drugs or alcohol is the first step. And while that is a big step – the next one, maybe even bigger: asking for help from someone else.

Here are 4 top tips to remember when asking someone else for help to overcome your addiction to substances.

The Role Rituals, Habits And OCD Play In Addiction And Recovery

One of the hardest parts of battling an addiction of any form (in this case, drugs and alcohol) is the cessation of rituals, habits and compulsions to do something in a set order or the same way every single time.

Certain things trigger the urge to use or drink, even things such as getting up in the morning, getting into the car, coming home from work, seeing certain people, doing certain activities and many, many others. As people living with an addiction, we build our lives around our illness. It is the centerpiece of our existence when our world becomes totally insular.

Find out what habits, rituals and compulsions are, what Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and how it can worsen those habits and rituals, along with treatment and coping strategies to manage and change those deep seated habits and rituals that have been built over months, years or even decades of chronic substance use and dependency.

Why Do We Have A Strong Urge To Find Out What Might Have Been — Even When This Leads To Feelings Of Regret?

Given the aversive experience of regret, traditional models of decision-making predict that people should to try to avoid it. But of course, the picture is more complex — we all have experienced the desire to know “what might have been”, even if it leads to regret. Now a study in Psychological Science, led by Lily FitzGibbon at the University of Reading, finds that the lure of finding out what might have been is surprisingly enticing.

As an extra bonus, you’ll find our 10 top tips for dealing With the regret surrounding past deeds while in addiction and/or recovery and what you can do next.

Creating And Implementing Relapse Prevention Plans – Our Comprehensive Guide

A relapse prevention plan (RPP) features a concrete course of action, outline coping mechanisms and ideas for managing cravings and triggers in times of stress when you may end up relapsing.
The plan can be amended and added to as time goes on and needs change. The more detailed the plan is, the more likely it is to be helpful during a variety of negative situations and events, should they arise.

Find out all you need to know and more, including downloadable templates, top tips, expert advice and printable checklists!…

Journaling In Addiction And Recovery – Our Ultimate Guide

The aim of this ultimate guide is to provide you with all of the best and latest information, research and advice, tips and tricks behind the basics of journaling (diary writing), look at the various ways you can do it and provide you with ideas and suggestions to get you going if you’ve never tried writing your thoughts and feelings down on paper before. We also look at the science surrounding journaling and improving your physical health, mental health, addiction and recovery.

You will also find over 40 prompts to get you going if you’re new to this concept, or if your minds gone blank or you can’t think of a thing to write, these topics will give you a great nudge in the right direction for your journaling for your addiction, physical health, mental health and recovery journey.

If it’s not in this ultimate guide, it’s not worth knowing!…

How To Talk To Kids About A Parent’s Drug Or Alcohol Addiction

Children living in homes where there is parental substance use or addiction can find life difficult, unpredictable, upsetting and confusing just to list a few examples. Sometimes they may even believe the alcohol or drug use is their fault.

That’s why purposefully preparing to speak to your kids, knowing what to say and having as much information about substance use and addiction as possible provides them with the reassurance and information they need as they walk along your recovery journey with you side by side.

This article hopes to help you better prepare and inform you about what’s happened to lead you upto this point, what’s going to happen and what’s to expect when you enter recovery and how you can mutually support each other going forward to ensure that you make the most of this vitally needed discussion.

Dating In Recovery: The 6 Important Questions You Must Ask Yourself

So you’ve begun to get the cravings under control and are starting to rebuild your life. You’re changing habits, changing your thinking and feeling hopeful about the future.

As you begin to find more enjoyment throughout your days, you might also be thinking it would be nice to have someone to share all these beautiful things with.
But before you jump head first into dating or a relationship, you need to ask yourself if you’re really ready for dating in recovery?

The 5 questions in this article will give you an idea about the things to consider and the things to avoid when it comes to dating or relationships while in your lifelong recovery journey.

What Children Learn When They Grow Up With Drug Or Alcohol Addicts As Parents

Studies tell us that the children of alcohol addicts and drug users are eight times more likely to become addicts than the children of clean and sober parents.

So why do the sons and daughters of addicts experience a significantly higher likelihood of developing their own addiction later on in life?

One could argue that close proximity to substance use throughout the child’s childhood gives them the idea that experimenting with using or drinking, relying upon substances to manage stress or negative feelings or using/drinking to satisfy a physical and mental dependency is “okay” or “normal”.

We discuss this issue in more detail, along with ways to help manage and overcome this issue. This article is part of our mini-series, looking at the effects substance use and addiction play in educating our children to reduce the amount of people who develop addictions and avoid recreationally using drugs and binge drinking later on in life.